Rat lungworm parasite reported in Florida counties – Story | FOX 13 Tampa Bay

Researchers at the University of Florida have discovered a parasite that can cause meningitis in humans and animals, in five Florida counties.

Rats and snails in Alachua, Leon, St. Johns, Orange and Hillsborough counties tested positive for the rat lungworm parasiteaccording to a study in PLoS ONE by researchers in the UF College of Veterinary Medicine and the Florida Museum of Natural History.

Researchers say people and pets can become infected by eating snails, infected frogs and crustaceans, causing potentially fatal meningitis.

Source: Rat lungworm parasite reported in Florida counties – Story | FOX 13 Tampa Bay

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Smoking, Gum Disease, and Tooth Loss | Overviews of Diseases/Conditions | Tips From Former Smokers | CDC

Do you still smoke?….Do you still have your teeth? It’s no longer debatable whether it will harm you or not, It’s a fact, Smoke and you will suffer!

You can deny and make excuses for smoking all you want but, in reality, there is no excuse for smoking!

How Is Smoking Related to Gum Disease?

Smoking weakens your body’s infection fighters (your immune system). This makes it harder to fight off a gum infection. Once you have gum damage, smoking also makes it harder for your gums to heal.

What does this mean for me if I am a smoker?

  1.   You have twice the risk for gum disease compared with a nonsmoker.
  2. The more cigarettes you smoke, the greater your risk for gum disease.
  3. The longer you smoke, the greater your risk for gum disease.
  4. Treatments for gum disease may not work as well for people who smoke.
  5. Tobacco use in any form—cigarettes, pipes, and smokeless (spit) tobacco—raises your risk for gum disease.7

Source: Smoking, Gum Disease, and Tooth Loss | Overviews of Diseases/Conditions | Tips From Former Smokers | CDC

What Happens to Your Body When You Drink Too Much Alcohol

Learn about the symptoms of alcohol poisoning that would dramatically impact your health and how it may cost you your life if it’s not properly addressed.

Don’t:

Tell them to sleep it off. The blood alcohol content can continue to rise even when they’re not drinking.

Give them coffee. This will further dehydrate the person.

Instruct them to walk around. This may only cause falls and bumps, which may result in serious injuries, given the brain’s unfit condition.

Ask them to take a cold shower. Alcohol lowers your body temperature, and making them feel colder than they already feel could lead to hypothermia.

Lastly, don’t wait for all the symptoms of alcohol poisoning to show up and don’t hesitate to call for emergency medical help immediately. Remember, BAC levels can rise rapidly, and time is of the essence in this situation. Being a minute too late could mean irreversible damage or even death.

Source: What Happens to Your Body When You Drink Too Much Alcohol

Make 2016 Your Year to Quit

Notepad with quit smoking written on itQuit smoking to start your year off right.

Every January 1, people all over the world make New Year’s resolutions. If you’re one of the nearly 7 in 10 U.S. smokers who want to quit, why not make a resolution to get started? Smoking is still the number one cause of preventable death and disease in the United States. Quitting now can cut your risk for diseases caused by smoking and leave you feeling stronger and healthier.

Tiffany, a former cigarette smoker, was 16 when her mother—also a smoker—died of lung cancer. Despite her loss, Tiffany started smoking. She finally decided to quit when her daughter Jaelin turned 16 because she could not bear the thought of missing out on any part of Jaelin’s life, like her own mother did. Her effort to quit began with setting a specific date to quit smoking and reaching out to family and friends for support. In the video “Tiffany’s Decision” from CDC’s Tips From Former Smokers (Tips) campaign, she talks about the “aha” moment that sent her on a different, healthier path for her own life.

Most smokers who want to quit try several times before they succeed, but you can take steps that can improve your chances of quitting for good.

Develop a Quit Plan

Planning ahead is a major part of successfully quitting smoking. Smokefree.gov offers details on how to create an effective quit plan, including:

  • Picking a quit date. Starting the new year smokefree is a great idea.
  • Letting loved ones know you’re quitting so they can support you.
  • Listing your reasons to quit smoking. See the “Smoking and Diabetes” ad featuring Bill—another former smoker who participated in the Tips campaign—for advice on finding your reasons to quit.
  • Figuring out what triggers make you want to smoke so you can avoid them, especially during the early days.
  • Having places you can turn to for help right away, including the free resources listed below.

Use Free, Effective Resources

There are many free resources for people trying to quit smoking:

  • 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669) or 1-855-DÉJELO-YA (1-855-335-3569) (for Spanish speakers). This free service offers a lot of resources, including coaching, help with making a quit plan, educational materials, and referrals to other resources where you live.
  • Smokefree TXT. This free 24/7 texting program sends encouragement, advice, and tips to help smokers quit smoking for good. To get started, just text QUIT to 47848, answer a few questions, and you’ll start receiving messages.
  • Online help. This Tips From Former Smokers web page provides helpful online quit resources.
  • Smokefree App. The QuitGuide is a free app that tracks cravings, moods, slips, and smokefree progress to help you understand your smoking patterns and build the skills needed to become and stay smokefree.

Talk to your health care provider about medicines that may help you quit smoking.

Doctor consulting with patientTalk to your health care provider about medicines that may help you quit smoking.

Find a Medication That’s Right for You

Because cigarettes contain nicotine, a powerfully addictive drug, when you first quit, your body may feel uncomfortable until it adjusts. This is known as withdrawal, and there are medications that can help lessen this feeling and the urge to smoke. Studies show that smokers who use medicine to help control cravings, along with coaching from a quitline, in a group, or from a counselor, are much more likely to succeed than those who go it alone. Talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider before using any medications if you:

  • Are pregnant or nursing
  • Have a serious medical condition
  • Are currently using other medications
  • Are younger than 18

Many options are available if you are considering using medications to help you quit smoking. The most common smoking medications are nicotine replacement therapies (NRTs), which give your body a little of the nicotine that it craves without the harmful chemicals found in burning cigarettes. Examples of Food and Drug Administration-approved NRTs that you can buy over the counter include:

  • Nicotine patches
  • Nicotine gum
  • Nicotine lozenges

NRTs that need a prescription include nicotine inhalers and nasal spray. Your doctor can also prescribe medication that does not contain nicotine (such as bupropion or varenicline) to help you quit smoking completely.

As the start of a new year approaches, isn’t now the perfect time to quit smoking? You can start 2016 as a healthier you by making a quit plan, using free resources, and finding a smoking medication that’s right for you. Even if you don’t smoke yourself, you can use this article to help a friend or family member become smokefree in 2016!

Prevent Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning

Graphic showing carbon monoxide can't be seen, smelled or heardDaylight Savings Time begins Sunday, March 13, 2016. As you prepare to set your clocks forward one hour, remember to check the batteries in your carbon monoxide (CO) detector. If you don’t have a battery-powered or battery back-up CO alarm, now is a great time to buy one. At least 430 people die each year in the United States from unintentional, non-fire related CO poisoning.

CO is found in fumes produced by furnaces, vehicles, portable generators, stoves, lanterns, gas ranges, or burning charcoal or wood. CO from these sources can build up in enclosed or partially enclosed spaces. People and animals in these spaces can be poisoned and can die from breathing CO.

When power outages occur during emergencies such as hurricanes or winter storms, the use of alternative sources of power for heating, cooling, or cooking can cause CO to build up in a home, garage, or camper and to poison the people and animals inside.

Carbon monoxide detector and alarmInstall a battery-operated CO detector in your home and check the batteries when you set your clocks forward one hour.

You Can Prevent Carbon Monoxide Exposure

Do

    • Have your heating system, water heater and any other gas, oil, or coal burning appliances serviced by a qualified technician every year.
    • Install a battery-operated CO detector in your home and check or replace the battery when you change the time on your clocks each spring and fall. If the detector sounds, leave your home immediately and call 911.
    • Seek prompt medical attention if you suspect CO poisoning and are feeling dizzy, light-headed, or nauseous.

Don’t

    • Run a car or truck inside a garage attached to your house, even if you leave the door open.
    • Burn anything in a stove or fireplace that isn’t vented.
    • Heat your house with a gas oven.
    • Use a generator, charcoal grill, camp stove, or other gasoline or charcoal-burning device inside your home, basement, or garage or outside less than 20 feet from a window, door, or vent.

CO poisoning is entirely preventable. You can protect yourself and your family by acting wisely in case of a power outage and learning the symptoms of CO poisoning.

Click here for important CO poisoning prevention tips in 16 additional languages.

For more information, please visit www.cdc.gov/co .