Here’s What Happens When You Quit Smoking

Research has demonstrated that it is never too late to quit smoking and reduce your risk of heart disease, stroke and cancer.

  • About 50 years ago, nearly 42 percent of U.S. adults smoked; in 2015 that number had dropped to 15 percent and experts would like it to drop to 12 percent by 2020
  • Research has found it’s never too late to quit as people between 50 and 74 demonstrate improved health benefits each year after quitting
  • When you quit smoking your body repairs the damage done by the toxic chemicals in the cigarettes, reducing your risk of heart disease, stroke and cancers each year you remain smoke free

Source: Here’s What Happens When You Quit Smoking

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What Happens to Your Body When You Smoke

Don’t stick your head in the sand! It’s your life you are gambling with!

Smoking makes you feel good in the short term, but can immensely damage your health in the long run. Read on to learn about the harmful side effects of smoking.

Source: What Happens to Your Body When You Smoke

Smoking, Gum Disease, and Tooth Loss | Overviews of Diseases/Conditions | Tips From Former Smokers | CDC

Do you still smoke?….Do you still have your teeth? It’s no longer debatable whether it will harm you or not, It’s a fact, Smoke and you will suffer!

You can deny and make excuses for smoking all you want but, in reality, there is no excuse for smoking!

How Is Smoking Related to Gum Disease?

Smoking weakens your body’s infection fighters (your immune system). This makes it harder to fight off a gum infection. Once you have gum damage, smoking also makes it harder for your gums to heal.

What does this mean for me if I am a smoker?

  1.   You have twice the risk for gum disease compared with a nonsmoker.
  2. The more cigarettes you smoke, the greater your risk for gum disease.
  3. The longer you smoke, the greater your risk for gum disease.
  4. Treatments for gum disease may not work as well for people who smoke.
  5. Tobacco use in any form—cigarettes, pipes, and smokeless (spit) tobacco—raises your risk for gum disease.7

Source: Smoking, Gum Disease, and Tooth Loss | Overviews of Diseases/Conditions | Tips From Former Smokers | CDC